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Articles related to the war on Iraq are posted at the Iraq link, and other links in the navigation bar at right .

March 8, 2005
Class Requirement: Crossing Lines on the Middle East: Mark Rosenblum's course has drawn praise from Jewish and Muslim students and others who say it has made them rethink their views. On a campus where increasing numbers of Muslim students study alongside Jews, he has been able to foster a civil dialogue over one of the era's most divisive issues, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. more...

February 20, 2005
In Secretly Taped Conversations, Glimpses of the Future President: As George W. Bush was first moving onto the national political stage, he often turned for advice to an old friend who secretly taped some of their private conversations, creating a rare record of the future president as a politician and a personality. more...

Issue of January 2005
More Stations, Less Variety: Barbara K. Iverson, writing for Conscious Choice, on "Battling Media Giants for Control of Chicago’s Radio Dial" more...

December 31, 2004
Conservative Students Push 'Academic Freedom' Issue: Increasingly, it is students who are invoking academic freedom, claiming biased professors are violating their right to a classroom free from indoctrination. more...

December 26, 2004
Web Option Becomes a Valid Route to Higher Education: Nearly one million students are pursuing an online degree, about 6 percent of all post-secondary enrollment, according to Eduventures, an education research and consulting firm in Boston. more...

December 23, 2004
Students to Bear More of the Cost of College: College students in virtually every state will be required to shoulder more of the cost of their education under new federal rules that govern most of the nation's financial aid. more...

December 23, 2004
Administration Overhauls Rules for U.S. Forests: The overhaul of the guidelines will make it easier for forest managers to decide whether to allow logging, drilling or off-road vehicles. more...

Issue of December 21, 2004
Why Students Struggle When Pressure Is On: In a new study of math testing, psychologists are reporting that intense exam pressure is actually more likely to impair the performance of very good students than mediocre ones. more...

Issue of December 21, 2004
U.S. Slips in Attracting the World's Best Students: American universities, which for half a century have attracted the world's best and brightest students with little effort, are suddenly facing intense competition as higher education undergoes rapid globalization. more...

Issue of December 20, 2004
Ukraine's Untold Story by Jonathan Steele in The Nation: However Ukraine's crisis is resolved, it is clear that interference by Russia and the United States has been massive. more...

December 7, 2004
Privatizing Social Security by Inventing a Crisis: Replacing the current system, in whole or in part, with personal investment accounts - won't do anything to strengthen the system's finances. If anything, it will make things worse. more...

November 28, 2004
Youth Movement Underlies the Opposition in Ukraine: Before the Ukrainian opposition here reached its eventual great mass and overwhelmed Kiev, swift and sophisticated signs appeared of organization to ensure that the pro-democracy rally formed and grew, and almost all of it was young. more...

November 20, 2004
Soaring Interest Compounds Credit Card Pain for Millions: Thousands of Americans are paying millions of dollars each month in increased fees because of the "fine print" in their credit agreements. Lenders are doubling or tripling interest rates with little warning or explanation. more...

November 7, 2004
One True Thing: Many children and their parents think they have found the one true thing. They remember a great teacher and, if they are lucky, more than one. Ask any parent how school is going this year, and if they're happy, the first thing they say is that their child has a great teacher. more...

October 26, 2004
The Dorms May Be Great, but How's the Counseling? The college campus can be a stressful place. Surveys show that the number of college students with mental health problems of all types is steadily increasing. more...

October 20, 2004
Public University Tuition Is Up Sharply for 2004 Tuition at the nation's public universities rose an average of 10.5 percent this year, the second largest increase in more than a decade. Last year's rise, 13 percent, was the highest. more...

October 17, 2004
30 on ACT? Let's see if you can write: Fed up with the poor quality of student writing, some universities for the first time are demanding to know: Can Johnny write? more...

October 10, 2004
Essay by Franklin Foer: Once Again America First: It's a significant shift: the conservative establishment is now expressing doubts about the prospects for American success in Iraq. Indeed, a small legion, from the powerful Representative Henry Hyde to the influential lobbyist Stephen Moore, are chiming in with the conservative commentator Tucker Carlson: "I supported the war and now I feel foolish." more...

posted October 13, 2004
How Tax Bill Gave Business More and More: The need to solve a narrow tax problem in 2002 gave birth to the biggest free-for-all in corporate lobbying that Congress has experienced in nearly 20 years. more...

posted October 11, 2004
A Day in the Life of Joe Republican: Joe gets up at 6:00 am to prepare his morning coffee. He fills his pot full of good, clean drinking water because some liberal fought for minimum water quality standards.... more...

October 6, 2004
A Clash of Goals in Bush's Efforts on the Income Tax: Almost all experts agree that the current tax code is hideously complicated and often unfair. But they also say that accomplishing any fundamental change will be hideously difficult, in part because Mr. Bush's goals clash with one another and with some of his own initiatives. more...

September 15, 2004
Survey Details How Americans Spend Their Time: Ever wonder how much time the average American spends trying, but failing, to sleep each night? How much time we spend each day waiting for food at a restaurant, talking to telemarketers, watching volleyball or having sex? more...

September 19, 2004
Putin Gambles on Raw Power: He seems to believe that democracy does not result in stability, but rather instability. It does not unify, but rather divides. Ethnic and religious tensions can only be controlled with an iron hand from above. more...

September 17, 2004
Writing Skills Necessary for Employment, Say Business Leaders: Poorly written job applications are a kiss of death, and corporations spend several billion dollars annually improving writing among employees, according to a survey on the quality of writing in U.S. schools and colleges. more...

September 15, 2004
National Study Shows Colleges in Need of Help: America's schools - from kindergarten to high school - have improved in recent years. But, in many states, universities are being left behind, according to a national "report card" of American higher education. more...

September 13, 2004
U.S. Slips in Global Education Survey : The United States is falling behind other countries in having a high school-educated public, with the gap widening the most among young adults, a new comparison of industrialized nations shows. more...

August 13, 2004
Report Finds Tax Cuts Heavily Favor the Wealthy: Fully one-third of President Bush's tax cuts have gone to people with the top 1 percent of income, who have earned an average of $1.2 million annually, says the nonpartisan CBO. more...

August 10, 2004
Budget Deficit Hits Record $395.8 Billion: The U.S. federal government ran a larger-than-expected budget deficit in July, bringing the year-to-date shortfall between receipts and spending to a record of nearly $400 billion, the Treasury Department said Wednesday. more...

August 9, 2004
It's Not Just the Jobs Lost, but the Pay in the New Ones: The stunningly slow pace of job creation, which sank to growth of just 32,000 in July, and the apparent weakness in high-paying jobs may be opposite sides of a coin. more...

August 8, 2004
It's Not Too Late To Come Up With Money Needed For College: College tuition bills are due this month, and for some families it will be panic time – but it's not too late to get help. more...

August 8, 2004
Sensing the Eyes of Big Brother, and Pushing Back: A small window has opened into just how the government may be using the most contentious parts of the "Patriot Act," and it has revealed enough information to stoke fresh fears in civic forums, in Congress, the capitals of four states - Alaska, Hawaii, Maine and Vermont - and among librarians. more...

August 7, 2004
In Blow to Bush, Only 32,000 Jobs Created in July: Job growth ground nearly to a halt last month, raising new concerns about the economy's strength and reshaping the political debate over its performance less than three months before election day. more...

August 1, 2004
A Century Later, Debate Over Role Of Teachers Goes On: Nearly 100 years ago, educators argued about whether they should be treated as civil servants or as professionals – and differing views persist. more...

dated July 20, 2004
Presbyterian Church Statement on Israel and Palestine: The church called for a "selective divestment of church funds from those companies whose business in Israel is found to be directly or indirectly causing harm or suffering..." and for an end to Israel’s construction of the "separation barrier" in occupied Palestine. It stopped short of branding Israeli policy as "apartheid." more...

August 4, 2004
Bush Administrations: A Record of Recovery:: When you look at the record, a quick summary is this: President Clinton inherited prosperity; President Clinton bequeathed recession. more...

July 30, 2004
Triumph of the Trivial by Op-Ed Columnist Paul Krugman: Somewhere along the line, TV news stopped reporting on candidates' policies, and turned instead to trivia that supposedly reveal their personalities. We hear about Mr. Kerry's haircuts, not his health care proposals. We hear about George Bush's brush-cutting, not his environmental policies. more...

July 19, 2004
An Emerging Catastrophe: That 10 percent of African-American men under 40 are incarcerated is a rather well-known – and devastating – statistic. Now a new study finds that 25 percent of all African-American men are out of work year round. more...

July 18, 2004
A Growing Force of Nonworkers: Since June 2000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of adults considered "not in the labor force" - those who don't have jobs and are not looking for them - has grown by about 4.4 million, to 66.6 million. more...

July 18, 2004
Hourly Pay in U.S. Not Keeping Pace With Price Rises: The amount of money workers receive in their paychecks is failing to keep up with inflation. Though wages should recover if businesses continue to hire, three years of job losses have left a large worker surplus. more...

June 28, 2004
Families, Deep in Debt, Facing Pain of Growing Interest Rates: With the Federal Reserve about to raise interest rates for the first time in four years, American families are beginning to wonder how they will deflect the growing cost of their credit card debt. more...

June 28, 2004
Healthcare in America: A Second Opinion "The fact is that the U.S. population does not have anywhere near the best health in the world . . . Of 13 countries in a recent comparison, the United States ranks an average of 12th (second from the bottom) for 16 available health indicators." more...

June 20, 2004
The Slump Has Ended, but Not the Gloom: Americans finally have reason to think that the long economic slump has ended. Employers are hiring again. The stock market has risen more than 40 percent. And how have the American people celebrated? By becoming a lot grumpier about the economy. more...

June 19, 2004
New Course for Liberal Arts: Intro to Job Market: After years of sending students out for internships to give them a taste of a possible career, officials at liberal arts colleges are beginning to look for ways to turn their faculty and classes to bolstering the career prospects of their students. more...

June 13, 2004
The Graduation Gap – Why More College Students Don't Finish: About two-thirds of this year's 3 million high school seniors will be starting college soon, an exciting time of unpacking, and buying textbooks, and forgetting that parents and curfews ever existed. The problem is this: Half of those young collegiates won't graduate. more...

June 13, 2004
Students Found Apathetic About Politics: Most college students doubt that voting in presidential elections will make major changes in American society, according to a nationwide survey. Only 35 percent of the students surveyed said presidential voting will create "a lot of change," compared to 47 percent who thought so in March 2001. more...

June 6, 2004
The Maestro Slips Out of Tune: Greenspan's judgment that tax cuts were needed to prevent excessive budget surpluses was a misjudgment of Rumsfeldian proportions. The U.S. is headed for a budget deficit of more than $400 billion this year, more than half of it a result of tax cuts passed since Greenspan gave Bush his support. more...

May 25, 2004
Gas Prices – The 50’-a-Gallon Solution: Senator John Kerry's support a decade ago of a 50-cent-per-gallon tax increase is ridiculed by Republicans. But the country would indeed be better off if it had happened. And the United States would still be wise today, if it increased gasoline taxes by the same amount now. more...

May 25, 2004
Gas Prices – The $40-a-Barrel Mistake: So what's the reason for the spectacular rise in crude oil prices to more than $40 a barrel? While there is plenty of blame to go around, responsibility rests largely on the defective — if well-meaning — policies pursued in the last couple of years by the two most important countries in the global oil market: Saudi Arabia and the United States. more...

May 21, 2004
Gas Prices – Tax and Drill: A conservative columnist writes: We had a golden moment in the Reagan years, when cars weighed 3,000 pounds, and oil was down to $7 a barrel. We should have artificially raised the price of gasoline with a tax to depress consumption, improve fuel efficiency and direct the pump price into the U.S. economy, not OPEC. But we didn't, cars now weigh over two tons and oil is at $41 a barrel. more...

May 19, 2004
White House Is Trumpeting Programs It Tried to Cut: The Bush White House has used the machinery of government to promote the re-election of the president by awarding federal grants to strategically important states. But administration officials are taking credit for spreading largess through programs that Bush tried to eliminate or to cut sharply. more...

May 19, 2004
Indiana Essays Being Graded by Computers: Indiana is the first state to use a computer-scored English essay test in a statewide assessment, and its experience could influence testing decisions in other states. Eighteen states now require students to pass a writing test for high school graduation, and, starting next year, both the SAT and the ACT will include writing in their college admission exams. more...

May 16, 2004
Corporate Profit Climbs 87% While Worker Pay Rises 4.5%: The increase in workers' pay was the smallest for the first nine quarters of any recovery since World War II, said Barry Bosworth, who directed the White House Council on Wage and Price Stability during Jimmy Carter's administration. After inflation, real wage gains were 1.1 percent, Bosworth said. more...

May 15, 2004
More Youths Opt for G.E.D., Skirting High-School Hurdle: A testing system created more than half a century ago to help World War II veterans earn the equivalent of a high school diploma has increasingly become a way for teenagers to short-circuit high school. more...

May 13, 2004
Op Chart – Where the Jobs Are: Over time, workers move up a "hierarchy of human talents," finding jobs that demand higher-order skills and offer better pay and working conditions. As depicted in this chart, the hierarchy provides a guide to the traits and qualities that will dominate the next employment wave. more...

Articles on crime & punishment

December 27, 2004
Why Some Politicians Need Their Prisons to Stay Full: Changes in the draconian sentencing laws have come very slowly. That is partly because the public thinks keeping a large chunk of the population behind bars is responsible for the reduced crime rates of recent years. more...

December 22, 2004
Want to Educate Yourself? Visit a Prison: One out of every 20 Illinois dollars in the Illinois general revenue fund goes to the Department of Corrections. For just one juvenile, it costs $60,000 a year. if you haven't made a New Year's resolution yet, here's a thought. Go visit a prison. If nothing else, just to know more about where your money goes. more...

December 22, 2004
New Papers Suggest Detainee Abuse Was Widespread: The Bush administration is facing a wave of new allegations that the abuse of foreign detainees in U.S. military custody was more widespread, varied and grave in the past three years than the Defense Department has long maintained. more...

December 21, 2004
New F.B.I. Files Describe Abuse of Iraq Inmates: F.B.I. memorandums portray abuse of prisoners by American military personnel in Iraq that included detainees' being beaten and choked and having lit cigarettes placed in their ears, according to newly released government documents. more...

December 5, 2004
Editorial: The System Endures: The worst aspect of the Abu Ghraib scandal is this: The system survived its public exposure. The Bush administration is vigorously prosecuting the lowly reservists depicted in the Abu Ghraib photos, while brazenly defending the larger process it established for extracting intelligence from prisoners. more...

July 19, 2004
An Emerging Catastrophe: That 10 percent of African-American men under 40 are incarcerated is a rather well-known – and devastating – statistic. Now a new study finds that 25 percent of all African-American men are out of work year round. more...

July 18, 2004
Prison Labor is Cheap, Tough for Private Companies to Beat: The office furniture industry was devastated and domestic furniture companies laid off tens of thousands of workers. Yet at a firm called Unicor, which is run by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, office-furniture sales jumped nearly 30 percent. The company's workforce of prisoners earns between 23 cents and $1.15 per hour. more...

June 27, 2004
Sentencing Decision's Reach Is Far and Wide: A Supreme Court decision requires any factor that increases a criminal sentence, except for prior convictions, to be proved to a jury beyond a reasonable doubt. Many sentencing schemes have allowed judges to impose longer sentences. more...

May 31, 2004
Bob Herbert on America's Abu Ghraibs: Americans were shocked by the sadism at the Abu Ghraib prison. But we shouldn't have been. Not only are inmates at prisons in the U.S. frequently subjected to similarly grotesque treatment, but Congress passed a law in 1996 that makes things worse. more...

May 29, 2004
Abused Iraqis 'Experienced Standard Fare of U.S. Jails': U.S. corrections experts and former inmates agree that the Abu Ghraib detainees experienced the standard fare of U.S. prisons, where authorities largely ignore abuse by guards, squalid conditions and danger from other inmates. more...

May 12, 2004
Almost 10% of All Prisoners Are Now Serving Life Terms: Almost 10 percent of all inmates in state and federal prisons are serving life sentences, up 83 percent from 1992. In New York and California, the figure is almost 20 percent. more...

May 3, 2004
With Longer Sentences, Cost of Fighting Crime Is Higher: The cost of fighting crime in the U.S., for police, prisons and courts, rose to a record $167 billion in 2001, $20 billion more than in 1999. The disproportionate growth in inmates reflects a decision by the public and politicians to become more punitive, sentencing more offenders to incarceration and for longer terms. more...

May 4, 2004
Repaving the Long Road Out of Prison: For years politicians rushed to pass tougher crime laws and build more prisons. Many scoffed at efforts to rehabilitate inmates. But with increasing prison costs and growing evidence that most inmates end up being arrested again, leaders and lawmakers are taking a new interest in preparing inmates for life on the outside. more...

May 9, 2004
Mistreatment of Prisoners Is Called Routine in U.S.: Physical and sexual abuse of prisoners, similar to what has been uncovered in Iraq, takes place in American prisons with little public knowledge or concern, according to corrections officials, inmates and human rights advocates. more...

May 9, 2004
Rank and File Left Out of Recovery: Despite an expanding economy and improved productivity in recent years, American workers are experiencing sluggish growth in wages. Adjusted for inflation, many workers last year essentially took home the same pay they did in 2001. Some wage increases aren't even keeping up with inflation. more...

April 29, 2004
U.S. Restrictions on Student Visas Becoming an International Issue: A series of articles discussing the problems caused by tightened U.S. policies on student visas. more...

April 23, 2004
A Pair of Op-Ed Articles on Bush's Polls: Polls are to Washington what box scores are to baseball teams. This week the news has been especially startling. After weeks of stories from the 9/11 hearings, and bloody unrest in Iraq, Bush has ticked past Kerry in the polls. But numbers are not always what they seem. more...

April 22, 2004
As Wealthy Fill Top Colleges, New Efforts to Level the Field: At prestigious universities around the country, from flagship state colleges to the Ivy League, more and more students from upper-income families are edging out those from the middle class, according to university data. more...

April 18, 2004
Nafta Tribunals Stir U.S. Worries: After the United State Supreme Court declined to hear its appeal, it seemed the company's day in court was over. But the NAFTA tribunal was an even higher court. The availability of this additional layer of review, above even the Supreme Court, is a significant development. more...

April 18, 2004
Is It Grade Inflation, or Are Students Just Smarter? A million dollars isn't what it used to be, and neither is an A in college. A's - including A-pluses and A-minuses - make up about half the grades at many elite schools, according to a recent survey by Princeton of the Ivy League and several other leading universities. more...

April 17, 2004
Pushing for Union, Columbia Grad Students Are Set to Strike: Graduate teaching assistants at Columbia University in New York City said yesterday that they would remain on strike until Columbia recognized their right to unionize. The strike could shut down hundreds of classes through the end of the school year. more...

April 16, 2004
College Vote Waning for Bush, Poll Says: President Bush's support on college campuses has dropped substantially in the past six months because of growing student dissatisfaction with the war in Iraq, the weak job market and Bush's stance on gay marriage. more...

April 12, 2004
Persistent TB Worries Health Pros: One of the world's deadliest diseases may be down across Illinois, but in a few pockets of the Chicago suburbs, tuberculosis seems to be creeping back up. more...

April 12, 2004
Even Tiny Income Hurts College Students' Federal Grants: We are a nation that believes in rewarding hard work. But the kids with the good work ethic are penalized because they get lower Pell grants. more...

April 12, 2004
Lead in Water Fosters Worry in Washington: Homeowners were shocked to learn that despite the great lengths they went to, their children still were exposed to worrisome lead levels through drinking tap water. more...

April 11, 2004
Debate Grows Over Antidepressant Use Among Preschoolers: While antidepressants and other mood-altering drugs have long been prescribed to adolescents, the fastest-growing group using such medication is children under age 5. more...

April 7, 2004
The End of the Age of Oil? Opinions Vary: It's called "the big rollover," the moment when worldwide demand for oil outstrips the global capacity to produce it. sMost oil experts agree that when that day of reckoning comes, it will signal the end of the oil age and the end of cheap energy. more...

April 4, 2004
Wait for U.S. Residency Soars Over 18-Month Span: Processing times — for everything from renewing an annual work permit to securing permanent legal residency — have as much as quadrupled over the last 18 months, despite the Bush administration's pledge to cut waiting times in half. more...

April 4, 2004
A Toxic Cover-up?: “I've been in government since Richard Nixon, Reagan, Carter and Clinton. I've never seen anything like this.” Whistleblower Jack Spadaro's talking about an alleged government cover-up of a disaster 25 times the size of the Exxon Valdez spill. more...

April 4, 2004
Hot Air at the Pump: Here's the bottom line: Painful as this may be for people who by choice or necessity drive a gas-guzzler or face a long commute, Americans don't have a constitutional right to cheap gas. more...

April 4, 2004
Bush & the Environment: Changing All the Rules: While its legislative initiatives have languished on Capitol Hill, the Bush administration has managed to effect a radical transformation of the nation's environmental laws, quietly and subtly, by means of regulatory changes and bureaucratic directives. more...

February 22, 2004
Taking Spin Out of Report That Made Bad Into Good Health: After more than 60 influential scientists, including 20 Nobel laureates, issued a statement criticizing what they described as the misuse of science by the administration to bolster its policies on the environment, arms control and public health, the Bush administration says it improperly altered the report, but it will soon publish the full, unexpurgated document. more...

February 1, 2004
Culture Wars – What's Love Got to Do With It? In a campaign year likely to be poisoned by a culture war over same-sex marriage, politicians feel compelled to play marriage counselors. Last month the president proposed a $1.5 billion program that will mount its own advertising push to promote "healthy marriages." more...

January 25, 2004
Oldest Living Whiz Kid Tells All: "The Fog of War" shows where the corporate model of sweetening news for stockholders can lead. We see the vintage clips of Mr. McNamara promoting good news and suppressing the bad as the Vietnam War turns sour — a "credibility gap" echoed by this administration's "Mission Accomplished" happy talk after the fall of Saddam. more...

January 25, 2004
The Only Superbad Power: George W. Bush has proposed a new world order – not a world in which arsenals would be sharply reduced and democracies would cooperate in resolving conflicts, ensuring human rights and protecting the environment. Instead, Bush and his team declared that America had the right to ensure its security any way it deemed proper, including pre-emptive war. The triumphant America of the 21st century would use multilateral institutions only when it suited American aims. more...

January 24, 2004
Has Feminism Been Replaced by Careerism? Feminist awareness and political questioning are just as hard for me to inspire as they are for Miss Watson in the movie. While my own college days in the 1980's overflowed with heated debates about women's rights and cultural politics in general, such fervor now seems absent from campus life. more...

January 18, 2004
Fixing Democracy: The morning after the 2000 election, Americans woke up to a disturbing realization: our electoral system was too flawed to say with certainty who had won. Three years later, things may actually be worse. more...

January 9, 2004
U.S. Companies Added Few Workers in December: Employers added only 1,000 new workers to the nation's payrolls last month, providing further evidence that the economic recovery is continuing to elude the labor market. The weak labor market called into question other measures, like weekly unemployment claims, that had suggested a firming jobs picture in December. more...

January 6, 2004
The Broken Promise of Nafta: In the United States, Nafta has failed to fulfill the most dire warnings of its opponents and the most fervent expectations of its supporters. In Mexico, however, the treaty remains controversial and even harmful — as do America's efforts to liberalize trade throughout the hemisphere. more...

January 6, 2004
Second Thoughts on Free Trade: When Ricardo said that free trade would produce shared gains for all nations, he assumed that factories would not be easily moved over international borders. Comparative advantage is undermined when companies relocate to take advantage of abundant cheap labor. Then some countries win and others lose. more...

December 30, 2003
Colleges Struggle to Help Black Men Stay Enrolled: Women outnumber men at most colleges, but the gap is especially large among black students. Nationally, barely a quarter of the 1.9 million black men between 18 and 24 — prime college-going years — were in college in 2000. By comparison, 35 percent of black women in the same age group and 36 percent of all 18- to 24-year-olds were enrolled in higher education. more...

December 29, 2003
The White-Collar Blues: A couple of million factory positions have disappeared in the short time since we raised our glasses to toast the incoming century. And now the white-collar jobs are following the blue-collar jobs overseas. Americans are working harder and have become ever more productive, but are not sharing in the benefits of their increased effort. more...

December 28, 2003
Meet the Tribune Editorial Board: Each day the Tribune's Editorial and Commentary pages present range of opinions, observations and prisms through which readers can shape how they choose to think about their world. These are the 11 Tribune journalists who write and edit these pages, plus a user's guide to the breadth of expressions that appear here. more...

December 28, 2003
Draft May Be Needed to Rein In All-Powerful Military: When we lost the draft a generation ago, we lost a lot. We lost the ability to have a meaningful discussion about anything that involves the military. The Pentagon has begun significant call-ups for the next major rotation of troops in Iraq, but it has no realistic plan for covering our military and domestic security commitments without exhausting our reserve forces. Any suggestion to reconsider the military status quo is met with a charge of not "supporting the troops." more...

December 28, 2003
Despite Mad-Cow Warnings, Industry Resisted Safeguards: Scientists had warned that mad cow disease would eventually appear in the U.S., but cattle owners and meatpackers repeatedly resisted calls for programs to test for the disease, and the U.S.D.A. went along with them. Congress came close three times to banning the sale of meat from sick cows, only to see the industry's allies block each of the bills. more...

December 27, 2003
Free Trade Accord at 10 – Growing Pains Are Clear: Leaders promised Nafta would create millions of good jobs, curb illegal immigration and raise living standards "from the Yukon to the Yucatan." A decade later, the verdict, even among Nafta's strongest supporters, is that for those goals free trade by itself is not enough. more...

December 27, 2003
German Youth Leader Urges – Let Them Use Crutches: Elderly people are soaking up Germany's financial resources, with lavish pensions and gold-plated health care plans. Such largess comes at the expense of young Germans, says the 24-year-old leader of the youth organization of Germany's largest conservative party, the Christian Democrats. more...

October 30, 2003
College Costs Skyrocketing as Sluggish Economy Spurs Budget Cuts: Higher education ought to be a right, available to every student who makes the grade, without regard to that student's ability to pay. But it's increasingly a privilege for the rich -- and an impossible burden for the poor. more...

December 26, 2003
State Productivity Study Upsets College Professors: Officials have launched a controversial examination of faculty productivity, a move that has riled professors at public universities throughout the state. "There's got to be a tangible, measurable benefit for the people of the state of Illinois for a professor doing research," say officials. more...

December 25, 2003
Europe Weighs the Unthinkable: High College Fees: There is a growing sense that universities need to look beyond the government for money. In continental Europe, where universities charge either nothing or nominal tuition fees, governments are just beginning to talk about if, and how much, they can reasonably expect students to pay. more...

December 25, 2003
Expert Warned That Mad Cow Was Imminent: Dr. Stanley Prusiner, a Nobel prize-winning neurologist and expert on Mad Cow, sought a meeting with the secretary of agriculture after becoming alarmed – but was rebuffed. more...

December 25, 2003
Diverse Schools More Likely to Be Labeled as Failing, Study Says: Public schools with diverse student populations are far more likely than those with homogeneous populations to be labeled as failing under President Bush's education law, according to a new California study. more...

December 25, 2003
Court Blocks U.S. Effort to Relax Pollution Rule: A federal appeals court on Wednesday at least temporarily blocked a Bush administration rule that would have relaxed existing regulations and allowed hundreds of aging power and industrial plants to make upgrades without installing modern pollution controls. more...

December 19 - 25, 2003
Coffee, Tea or Handcuffs? Department of Homeland Security Hospitality: “I want to say right off that I adore America and love Americans,” says this Australian journalist. Still, she remains perplexed and emotionally bruised by the nightmare that greeted her, in the form of security procedures at LAX. more...

December 21, 2003
A Recovery for Profits, but Not for Workers: Output is clearly rising, and, normally, that would feed into both corporate profits and labor income. But while profits have shot up as a percentage of national income, reaching their highest level since the mid-1960's, labor's share is shrinking. Not since World War II has the distribution been so lopsided in the aftermath of a recession. more...

January 5, 2004
The Death of Horatio Alger: The other day I found myself reading outrageous claims about America – that we're becoming a society in which the poor tend to stay poor, no matter how hard they work... The name of the leftist rag? Business Week, which published an article titled "Waking Up From the American Dream." more...

December 22, 2003
U.S. New & World Report Investigative Report: Keeping Secrets For the past three years, the Bush administration has quietly but efficiently dropped a shroud of secrecy across many critical operations of the federal government--cloaking its own affairs from scrutiny and removing from the public domain important information on health, safety, and environmental matters. The result has been a reversal of a decades-long trend of openness in government while making increasing amounts of information unavailable to the taxpayers who pay for its collection and analysis. more...

December 18, 2003
U.S. Charges Former Governor Ryan with Pattern of Corruption: A sweeping federal indictment of former Gov. George H. Ryan charged that he received illegal cash payments, gifts and vacations, and helped his family members reap almost $167,000 in similar benefits – all from a Ryan confidant who made huge illicit profits on state contracts and leases. more...

December 18, 2003
The True Costs of S.U.V.'s Traffic fatalities in the U.S. have been rising; by 2002 there were 38,300 traffic deaths a year. America's ranking has fallen from first to ninth over the last 30 years, with Australia, Britain and Canada all having better records. A big part of the difference between the U.S. and other countries seems to be the prevalence of S.U.V.s and pickups on American highways. more...

December 18, 2003
Hussein Enters Post-9/11 Web of U.S. Prisons: A global detention system run by the Pentagon and the Central Intelligence Agency – it is a secretive universe of large and small facilities scattered throughout the world that have sprouted up to handle the hundreds of suspected Al Qaeda, Taliban warlords and former officials of the Iraqi government arrested since 9/11. more...

December 16, 2003
Lost Liberties – "This is not America" In Miami, during the FTAA protests in Miami on Nov. 20, police unleashed unprecedented fury on demonstrators -- most of them seniors and union members. Is this how Bush's war on terror will be fought at home? This is the first installment of "Lost Liberties," a series of stories that will be published in the months ahead exploring the erosion of civil rights and personal freedom in the United States since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. more...

December 15, 2003
The Demolition Machine Rolls On in Chicago: Thousands of architecturally and historically significant buildings were supposed to have a better chance at survival under a highly touted "demolition delay" amendment to the city's building code. Despite the ordinance, the demolition machine that has devastated Chicago's architectural heritage continues to run at full-throttle, homogenizing once-distinct neighborhoods. more...

December 14, 2003
Iraq, Internet Lure Youth to Politics: Every four years, young people flock to presidential candidates, performing the campaign scut work and promoting an image of youthful exuberance for the cause. And nearly every four years, a majority of 18- to 24-year-olds, a bloc of 24 million people, don't vote. But now there are signs of rising interest in politics among young people... the war in Iraq, the environment and the economy are major issues fueling interest in the presidential campaign, and the Internet has emerged as a powerful campaign tool allowing young people unprecedented access to the political debate. more...:

December 7, 2003
US Spending Surges to Historic Level: President Bush and the Republican-led Congress are spending money at a rate not seen since World War II—and America's expanding war on terrorism isn't the main reason. The spending growth is punctuated this week by a single vote in the House that wraps in all the spending leftovers—not all the money for troops, not the big Medicare expansion—and totals $820 billion. That's as big as the annual economic output of Sweden and Spain combined. Behind the shift are several factors, notably the Republican Party's changing strategy and the lapsing of self-imposed fiscal restraints in Congress since Mr. Bush took office. more...:

December 7, 2003
Discount Nation—Is Wal-Mart Good for America? The holiday shopping season is here, and Wal-Mart, the juggernaut of retailing, already seems to have claimed its first victim: F.A.O. Schwarz is filing for bankruptcy. Analysts explained that the F.A.O. Schwarz formula of selling premium-priced toys in sumptuous surroundings could not withstand the steady advance of Wal-Mart into the toy business. The toy war is merely the most recent manifestation of what is known as the Wal-Mart effect. To critics, Wal-Mart points the way to a grim Darwinian world of bankrupt competitors, low wages, meager health benefits, jobs lost to imports, and devastated downtowns and rural areas across America. more...:

December 1, 2003
What Economic Recovery? The Bush Administration and its crony pundits should pay attention to the real state of the economy – where nine million people are out of work, wages and salaries are stagnant or down, health care costs have increased to staggering double digit rates, retirement savings have been ravaged by the stock market crash, school budgets are taking severe hits, tuitions at public universities are soaring and personal bankruptcies are at an all-time high. more...:

December 1, 2003
Fighting homelessness: Chicago's plan: In a move being closely watched around the country, the city is undertaking an ambitious experiment: a 10-year "plan to end homelessness," a drastic shift in strategy that emphasizes permanent housing over shelters. more...:

November 30, 2003
The Unemployment Myth – Why Jobs Aren't Growing: We didn't have a mild recession and a jobless recovery. We covered up a deep recession and will need a sizable bit of recovery just to get us back to the point the unemployment rate suggested we already were. As the Red Queen said to Alice in "Through the Looking Glass": "Here, you see, it takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!" more...:

November 30, 2003
Improved Productivity – or Are We Working Harder? In the end, America's productivity revival may be nothing more than a transition from one way of doing business to another — a change in operating systems, as it were. Aided by the stock market bubble and the Y2K frenzy, corporate America led the world in spending on new information technology and telecommunications in the latter half of the 1990's. more...:

November 30, 2003
Frank Talk About Abortion: The current debate about so-called partial birth abortion has produced some strange and unfortunate consequences. Among the most disheartening is the widespread impression that the pro-choice movement does not regard abortion as a serious matter, and that women seeking to terminate a pregnancy require a condescending reminder from Congress to understand that the fetus they are carrying is a potential life. more...:

November 27, 2003
Analysts: Medicare Drug Costs Will Rise: Seniors will face annual increases in premiums and deductibles — and a growing gap in coverage — for the prescription drugs they buy under the new Medicare law, budget analysts say. more...:

November 27, 2003
GOP Pulled No Punches in Struggle for Medicare Bill: Conservative pundit Bob Novak writes, "The conservative Club for Growth's Steve Moore, writing to the organization's directors and founders, said defeat of the Medicare bill 'would have been a shot across the bow at the Republican establishment that conservatives are sick of the spending splurge that is going on inside Washington these last few years.' Hammering the conservatives to prevent that may have been only a short-term triumph." more...:

November 21, 2003
The Bush Record on the Environment: This administration, in catering to industries that put America's health and natural heritage at risk, threatens to do more damage to our environmental protections than any other in U.S. history. Here is the National Resources Defense Council's account of what the Bush administration has done and is doing on environmental matters... more...:

November 21, 2003
Crimes Against Nature: Bush is sabotaging the laws that have protected America's environment for more than thirty years, by Robert F. Kennedy Jr., in Rolling Stone... more...

November 20, 2003
"We Have Become Revenue Addicts": Big-time college sports are a mess. Given the academic and financial corruption and unacceptable behavior that are epidemic... more...

November 18, 2003
Black Quits Hollinger Over Undisclosed Fees: Conrad Black on Monday relinquished control of Hollinger International, the US-listed newspaper publisher, following revelations that senior management had received more than $30m in payments without the board's knowledge. Three other senior executives - including David Radler, group president and publisher of the Chicago Sun-Times - will be leaving following the internal investigation that uncovered the payments. more...

August 8, 2003
Gore Says Bush Has Misled Americans: Former vice president Al Gore issued a broad indictment of President Bush yesterday, accusing the man who narrowly defeated him in 2000 of leading a "systematic effort" to mislead the American people about the war in Iraq, the state of the economy and the future of the global environment. more...

August 7, 2003
Pew Poll – Bush Increasingly Vulnerable: Bush's overall approval rating has declined to pre-Iraq war levels and his lead in a match-up with a hypothetical Democrat has narrowed to five points (43%-38%). Nearly six-in-ten Americans (57%) now say the economy - not terrorism - is the more important presidential priority. At the same time, Democratic candidates have made modest gains in visibility, and potential support, since early-July. more...

Wednesday, July 16, 2003
White House Foresees 5-Year Debt Increase Of $1.9 Trillion: WThe White House Office of Management and Budget officially pegged the 2003 budget deficit at a record $455 billion, up sharply from $158 billion in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, 2002.     more...

Sunday, June 29, 2003
Do You Believe in the U.S. Constitution?: What a question! Of course you do. And so this poll by USA Weekend and the First Amendment Center may surprise you.    more...

Sunday, June 29, 2003
Affirmative Action and the Universities: Not long ago, it looked as if an irresistibly powerful anti-affirmative-action wave might be sweeping the country. The recent Supreme Court decision provides what looks like a guarantee that affirmative action in admissions is now safe for another generation. Having it in writing — writing that has the force of law — is always a relief..    more...

Tuesday, June 24, 2003
In Split Decision, Court Backs Affirmative Action: The Supreme Court issued a qualified but resounding endorsement of affirmative action in higher education today, in a pair of historic decisions that, taken together, ratified diversity as a rationale for race-conscious admissions and laid out constitutionally acceptable means for achieving it. A slender five-justice majority upheld the University of Michigan law school's approach to enrolling a "critical mass" of African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans, under which the school considers each applicant student individually and sets no explicit quota. At the same time, a six-justice majority rejected, as too mechanistic, Michigan's undergraduate affirmative action program, under which members of these "underrepresented" groups get an automatic 20-point bonus on the 150-point scale used to rank applicants.    more...

Tuesday, June 24, 2003
Decision Means Most Colleges Will Stay Course: Most of the nation's colleges and universities should not have to alter their admissions procedures because of yesterday's Supreme Court decisions upholding race-conscious affirmative action for achieving racial diversity but outlawing highly mechanical methods of reaching that goal, according to college presidents, lawyers and higher education lobbyists. Many university leaders view the court's decisions as a ringing endorsement of their current practices and a road map for crafting affirmative action programs that pass constitutional muster.    more...

Saturday, June 14, 2003
Parents Uncork Teen Alcohol Debate: Should teens be allowed to drink under parental supervision? The supervised-drinking approach started gaining popularity about five years ago. Around the same time, the "social norms" campaign – stressing not abstinence but moderation – was launched at many colleges, and the message then trickled down to high school. Beer giant Anheuser-Busch is a major funder of such college alcohol-education programs.    more...

Saturday, June 14, 2003
Anti-Tax Crusaders Work for Big Shift: After the third tax cut in three years, some Bush administration policymakers are pushing for more fundamental changes that would largely shelter investments from taxation, dramatically changing the way Americans are taxed and how the government is financed. But they are running into surprising opposition from White House officials who fear that such prescriptions could have dangerous economic and political consequences as the budget deficit grows.    more...

Saturday, June 13, 2003
Change in Aid Formula Shifts More Costs to Students: Millions of college students will have to shoulder more of the cost of their education under federal rules imposed late last month through a bureaucratic adjustment requiring neither Congressional approval nor public comment of any kind. The changes, only a slight alteration in the formula governing financial aid, are expected to diminish the government's contribution to higher education by hundreds of millions of dollars, starting in the fall of 2004.    more...

Saturday, June 7, 2003
Deflation to Hit U.S. Next Year? The European Central Bank president is convinced deflation won't hit the euro zone. Alan Greenspan, chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve, has called deflation a "low probability" for the United States. But a dispassionate crunch of the numbers shows that U.S. consumer prices are set to slide below zero early next year for the first time in 50 years.    more...

Thursday, June 5, 2003
Senators Move to Restore F.C.C. Limits on the Media: A bipartisan majority of an important Senate committee indicated today that it would vote to overturn some of the media ownership rules adopted two days ago, reversing one of the most significant deregulatory steps undertaken during the Bush administration.    more...

Monday, May 26, 2003
Congress Clears Tax Incentive for SUV Purchases: Critics called it a loophole that unfairly benefits the auto industry and provides an unnecessary perk to business people who do not need, but want to buy the largest, most-polluting and fuel hungry SUVs. “People will now do it because they are economically rational enough to go for the tax break,” said David Nemtzow, president of the Alliance to Save Energy....    more...

Friday, May 23, 2003
A Tax Cut Without End: True, the price tag on the tax bill the House approved this morning is officially only $320 billion over 10 years, barely two-fifths of the $726 billion President Bush proposed in February. But the $320 billion figure, which is expected to clear the Senate today, is artificial. Calculated on a 10-year basis, the cost in lost revenue stands to be over $800 billion, more than what the president proposed, according to the first analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priority...    more...

Friday, May 23, 2003
Q&A – A Guide to the Mideast 'Road Map': "Road map" is diplomatic-journalistic shorthand for a Middle East peace plan developed by the United States, the European Union, Russia and the United Nations. It is called a road map because it envisions a step-by-step process by which both Israelis and Palestinians take actions to reach the eventual goal...     more...

Saturday, May 11, 2003
Radio Deregulation Cuts Both Ways: The Quad Cities' 13 commercial radio stations are operated by two media giants. It's just the sort of consolidation that has occurred nationwide since radio was significantly deregulated in 1996. And this concentration is coming under intensified scrutiny now that the government is poised to further relax media ownership rules.    more...

Saturday, May 11, 2003
Deregulation Gains are Not Free of Pain: The loudest voices these days are calling to have the federal government free industries, including the media, from the burden of regulation. But there was a time when regulation was considered the progressive idea, and business the dangerous force to be reined in.    more...

Saturday, May 11, 2003
GOP Eyes Tax Cuts as Annual Events: White House officials have told allies they will attempt a new tax cut every year Bush remains in office, and there is already talk of another round. The ultimate target -- overhauling the tax code and sharply reducing the size of the government -- may never be achieved. But the incremental steps in that direction help to keep the Republican Party unified and the president in an unending debate with Democrats over the tax burden on Americans.    more...

Saturday, May 3, 2003
Campaign Finance Law, Wounded, Heads to Supreme Court: The fate of a sweeping new campaign finance law aimed at taking big money out of politics now rests with the Supreme Court. A special three-judge federal court panel struck down a broad ban on the use of corporate and union "soft money" contributions by political parties. The panel ruled that political parties can raise corporate and union contributions for general party-building activities but cannot use them for issue advertising or candidate-specific activities. ...    more...

Sunday, April 27, 2003
White Resigns As Army Secretary: Army Secretary Thomas E. White resigned yesterday after a two-year tenure marked by strains with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and controversy over White's former employment with Enron Corp. A brief Pentagon statement announcing the resignation gave no reason for White's decision to step down as the Army's top civilian.... The timing of the announcement caught many by surprise. White had not informed many members of his senior staff, and the Army's public affairs office also was caught off guard. ...    more...

Saturday, April 26, 2003
Rolling Back the 20th Century: George W. Bush, properly understood, represents the third and most powerful wave in the right's long-running assault on the governing order created by twentieth-century liberalism. The first wave was Ronald Reagan...The second wave was Newt Gingrich ...    more...

Saturday, April 26, 2003
Illegal Aliens Can Be Held Indefinitely, Ashcroft Says: Attorney General John Ashcroft has ruled that illegal immigrants who have no known links to terrorist groups can be detained indefinitely to address national security concerns... Because immigration judges are part of the Justice Department, rulings made by Mr. Ashcroft must serve as the basis for any decisions. ...    more...

Thursday, April 24, 2003
A Nation Lost: Opinion by James Carroll "Centered on coercive unilateralism, the new doctrine assumes that the United States not only stands apart from other countries but above them. The primitive tribalism of boys at football games -- "We're number one!" -- has been transformed into an axiom of strategy. Military force has replaced democratic idealism as the main source of US influence." ...    more...

Monday, April 21, 2003
The Silence about September 11: They call it "The fog of war" for a reason. A lot of things get lost in the fire and the smoke that should not be forgotten, and yet they are, spent and cast aside like depleted uranium shell casings left to roast on a dusty desert roadside. In this relatively quiet space between war in Iraq and whatever battle zone the Bush administration will next come to conjure, it serves us to remember a few home facts that should never, ever be lost. ...    more...

Monday, April 21, 2003
Bush is Quietly Reshaping Environmental Policy to expand logging and other development by settling a series of lawsuits, many of them filed by industry groups. As a result of settlements, the administration has announced plans to remove wilderness protections from millions of acres of land in Utah. It also agreed to review protections for endangered species such as salmon and the northern spotted owl, reversed a Clinton-era ban on snowmobiles in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and softened rules on logging. None of the decisions were subject to prior public comment or congressional approval. ...    more...

Thursday, April 16, 2003
The secret society: America As an Orwellian State: Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft's Justice Department is eyeing legislation – dubbed PATRIOT Act II – that would further expand the administration's powers to act in secret. Meanwhile, Hatch is working to make PATRIOT Act I permanent now – it is currently set to expire in 2005 – before Congress can consider whether the Justice Department is making appropriate use of the broad surveillance powers provided by it. In the war on terror – and outside of it – the Bush administration is finding increasing latitude to operate with secrecy as the norm, and accountability the exception. ...    more...

Friday, April 11, 2003
Court rips college for censoring paper: Student journalists at south suburban Governors State University won a federal Appeals Court ruling Thursday in a 1st Amendment case that was closely watched on college campuses nationwide. A three-judge panel rejected an argument that college administrators have the same power as high school officials to censor school-sponsored newspapers. "Attempts by school officials, like Dean Carter here, to censor or control constitutionally protected expression in student-edited media have consistently been viewed as suspect under the 1st Amendment," wrote Judge Terence Evans on behalf of the panel...    more...

Thursday, April 3, 2003
Students Rally in Support of Affirmative Action: Well over 50,000 people rallied in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in favor of the University of Michigan's affirmative action policies, now under review by the Court. Students, union members, and other civil rights proponents traveled from all over the country to show their support for the university, whose policies for promoting diversity within their community are under fire from reactionaries.    more...

Sunday, April 6, 2003
Forecasters underrating weakness of US economy: US economists have grossly and chronically underestimated the US economy's weakness this year, in a fashion typically found during a turning point toward a new recession. Over the past two months, forecasters have consistently predicted a resumption of the recovery and underpredicted big drops seen over the past two months in employment, production, retail sales and home purchases – even though most of those figures lag by a month, released by the time most of the developments of the reported month are already widely known.    more...

Saturday, April 5, 2003
Latin Sweatshops Pressed by U.S. Campus Power: This former sweatshop recently now provides raises, scholarships and other benefits to workers – the latest victory for a once unlikely coalition of United States college students, labor activists and world-class brands like Nike and Reebok working to improve labor conditions in the factories in developing countries that make caps and clothing emblazoned with university names and mascots.     more...

Saturday, April 5, 2003
Anti-war students attempting to reignite flames of protest: In an era when there is no draft to give young people a direct connection to the war in Iraq, when there are many social causes to invest effort in and when many students are apolitical, activists across the country are struggling to motivate America's campuses.     more...

Saturday, April 5, 2003
Professors Protest as Students Debate: Across the country, the war is disclosing role reversals, between professors shaped by Vietnam protests and a more conservative student body traumatized by the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Prowar groups have sprung up at Brandeis and Yale and on other campuses. One group at Columbia, where last week an antiwar professor rhetorically called for "a million Mogadishus," is campaigning for the return of R.O.T.C. to Morningside Heights...    more...

Friday, April 4, 2003
Mugging the Needy: Bush Budget "Awful": With the eyes of most Americans focused on the war, the Bush administration and its allies in Congress are getting close to agreeing on a set of budget policies that will take an awful toll on the poor, the young, the elderly, the disabled and others in need of assistance and support from their government. The budget passed by the House is particularly gruesome. It mugs the poor and the helpless while giving unstintingly to the rich. This blueprint for domestic disaster has even moderate Republicans running for cover.    more...

Friday, April 4, 2003
Utah Students Rally for Health Care: Students for Choice organized a rally in the hopes of getting administrators to change the current student health insurance policy offered by the University of Utah. Sen. Paula Julander, D-Utah, was on hand to urge rallygoers to sign petitions and fight for a change in current student health insurance policies.     more...

Friday, April 4, 2003
Finnish National Student Union Calls for Student Aid: Finnish students do not wish to live off loaned money, and other forms of financial support should be increased. The student associations also point out that education is often cited as the key to Finland's competitiveness and economic growth. Therefore, if society wishes to see shorter graduation times, it should be prepared to provide the financial means to focus on studies full-time.     more...

Tuesday, March 25, 2003
Channels of Influence — the Menacing Concentration of Broadcast Power Recent pro-war rallies haven't drawn nearly as many people as antiwar rallies, but they have certainly been vehement. Like the one that took place after a Dixie Chicks singer criticized President Bush. Turns out they are being promoted by key players in the radio industry — with close links to the Bush administration.     more...

Friday, February 7, 2003
Increasing Threats to Academic Freedom After 9-11: The climate for academic freedom has worsened severely since 9-11, because of a mix of new government policies and decisions by university administrators, including restrictions on scholarly research and intimidation of students.     more...

Monday, January 20, 2003
  America's Twisted Love Affair With Sociopathic SUVs.: Perverse federal regulations have actually encouraged auto companies to make SUVs big and wasteful, creating the very emblem of contemporary selfishness. Special congressional exemptions permit the vehicles to emit far more smog-forming pollutants and greenhouse gases than regular cars. Safety loopholes allow SUVs to be more dangerous than regular cars....     more...

Thursday, December 12, 2002
Iraqi document names western arms suppliers, reports The Guardian, London's respected newspaper. "The names of western companies which helped Baghdad amass a nuclear, chemical and biological arsenal" are contained in chapters covering "procurements" in Iraq's nuclear programme and "relations with companies, representatives and individuals" for its chemical weapons programme," the journal reports.     more...

Thursday, December 5, 2002
"The collapse of union membership in America is why the poor and middle class are still being cheated of pensions, healthcare and a fair share of the GDP," write Barbara Ehrenreich and Thomas Geoghegan in the current issue of The Nation magazine. "Our labor laws do not let people join unions, freely and fairly, without being fired." The authors propose a number of approaches and initiatives...     more...

Monday, December 2, 2002
U.S. antiwar movement is broad-based: "The extraordinary array of groups questioning the Bush administration's rationale for an invasion of Iraq includes longtime radical groups such as the Workers World Party, but also groups not known for taking stands against the government, [including] a labor movement against war... a religious movement against the war... a veterans movement against the war... business leaders against the war, led by corporate leaders; an antiwar movement led by relatives of victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks; and immigrant groups against the war."     more...

Sunday, October 13, 2002
Religious leaders at front of war protest: The Chicago Tribune today reports that "mainstream religious leaders who largely remained silent during the military campaign in Afghanistan are protesting a pre-emptive strike in Iraq with an organized outcry not witnessed in the United States since the Vietnam War. Many are issuing action alerts urging congregants to attend rallies, contact legislators and pray for peace. In Chicago, numerous churches are taking part in protests and prayer vigils, holding teach-ins and sending delegations to Iraq."    more...

Sunday, October 6, 2002
Senate debate on the use of force in Iraq included these excerpts from Senator Robert C. Byrd, Democrat of West Virginia, and Sam Brownback, Republican of Kansas, as reported in the New York Times on Oct. 4. "We are rushing into war without fully discussing why," Byrd said, "without thoroughly considering the consequences, or without making any attempt to explore what steps we might take to avert a conflict."     more...

Sunday, October 6, 2002
President Bush: the U.S. must be prepared to act alone. "While the United States will constantly strive to enlist the support of the international community," he said, "we will not hesitate to act alone, if necessary, to exercise our right of self-defense by acting preemptively..." This is the complete White House document outlining the administration's national security policy.     more...

Sunday, October 6, 2002
Things got so bad at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor this spring that both Arab and Jewish students reported receiving death threats. This New York Times article, published Oct. 5, was flagged by David Krause, Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence, where civic engagement is always a high priority.    more...

Recent articles from Truthout.org This progressive website is a good source of articles on current issues     more...